Monthly Archives: July 2013

PhD Dissertation Lengths

Marcus Beck, a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota, has created a chart demonstrating the varying average lengths of PhD dissertations by discipline. According to io9, “Beck took the pressure of readying for his defense and channeled it toward … Continue reading

Posted in Academic Publishing, Archival Research, Education Policy, Graduate Work in History, Humanities Education, Information Management | Leave a comment

New Review of Warrior Pursuits in French

A new book review by Gregory Champeaud critiques my Warrior Pursuits: Noble Culture and Civil Conflict in Early Modern France (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Champeaud’s review was recently published in French in the online journal, Francia-Recencio. The … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, European History, European Wars of Religion, French History, French Wars of Religion, History of Violence, Noble Culture and History of Elites, Reformation History, Religious Violence, Revolts and Revolutions, War, Culture, and Society, Warfare in the Early Modern World | Leave a comment

Gates Foundation’s Influence on Higher Ed

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has enormous influence on universities and colleges¬† in the United States and it is seeking to fundamentally transform higher education. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, “the foundation wants nothing less than to … Continue reading

Posted in Education Policy, Humanities Education | 2 Comments

French Cuisine and Frozen Food

French haute cuisine restauranteurs are upset by revelations that many other restaurants are using frozen ingredients and even serving entire factory-frozen dishes. The Washington Post reports that “a chunk of tuna cooked Provencal style with an attractive ratatouille on the … Continue reading

Posted in European Union, Food and Cuisine History, French History, Paris History | Leave a comment

The Mental Health Benefits of Reading

Reading is often seen as an educational pursuit and an enjoyable habit. Now, neurological research suggests that reading has demonstrable benefits for mental health. A recent neurological study of 294 people found that “reading books, writing and engaging in other … Continue reading

Posted in Education Policy, History of Medicine, History of Science, Humanities Education, Information Management | Leave a comment

Interviewing War Criminals

What is it like to confront evil in a face-to-face encounter? This is a question that James Dawes poses to himself frequently as he interviews war criminals. Dawes, a professor of English and director of the Program in Human Rights … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Historiography and Social Theory, History in the Media, History of Violence, Human Rights, Laws of War, Museums and Historical Memory, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

Continuing Egyptian Revolution

The Egyptian Revolution continues to develop, although the international news media has largely treated it as a process completed after the Arab Spring, which launched revolutionary processes in Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Lybia, and other countries. This week, the Egyptian military … Continue reading

Posted in Civil Conflict, Civilians and Refugees in War, Comparative Revolutions, History of Violence, Human Rights, Mediterranean World, Religious Violence, Revolts and Revolutions, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

Recreating Early Modern Medicinal Gardens

The New York Botanical Garden has recreated a sixteenth-century medicinal garden as part of its exhibit on Wild Medicine: Healing Plants Around the World. The medicinal garden is patterned on the botanical garden that was created in 1545 for the … Continue reading

Posted in Early Modern Europe, Early Modern World, Environmental History, European History, Globalization, History of Medicine, History of Science, Mediterranean World | Leave a comment

Collection of War Letters Opens

A large private collection of American war letters is preparing to open to the public. The collection is the result of the work of Andrew Carroll, an individual collector who became curious about wartime letters after suffering the loss of … Continue reading

Posted in Archival Research, History of Violence, Museums and Historical Memory, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment

Fellowships at Pritzker Military Library

Deadline extended! The Pritzker Military Library is seeking two fellowship candidates to work with its Veterans Information Center and Oral History departments. These are paid part time fellowship positions in partnership with the Mission Continues. All candidates must be OEF/OIF … Continue reading

Posted in Careers in History, Graduate Work in History, Grants and Fellowships, Humanities Education, Museums and Historical Memory, Undergraduate Work in History, War, Culture, and Society | Leave a comment